Speeding fines to cross EU borders

Meeting of EU transport ministers agrees to deliver the details of drivers caught breaking foreign motoring laws

3 December 2010
By

DRIVERS of foreign cars will no longer be immune from the flash of speed cameras or other motoring offences.

Transport ministers from EU countries have agreed to share the details of motorists whose vehicles are caught breaking foreign driving laws.

Seven offences will be covered by the new rules; speeding, jumping red lights, drink driving, not wearing a seat belt, using a mobile phone while driving, misusing the emergency lane or hard shoulder, and driving under the influence of drugs.

The new rules will come into force before the end of 2013.

Ministers have agreed in principle to release the names and addresses of the registered vehicle owners to the police authorities of EU states where an offence was committed.

Further details on how police forces will use this information in terms of prosecution and how registered owners (who may not be the person who committed the offence) can respond , will need to be finalised.

French transport minister Thierry Mariani said France, as a major centre of tourism and a nation that borders eight other countries, would benefit from the measures.

Mr Mariani said that, on average, 25 per cent of driving offences were committed by motorists with foreign plates, a figure that rose as high as 50 per cent during the summer and 75 per cent in border areas.

EU figures reveal that, although foreign vehicles represent just five per cent of traffic across the union, they account for 15 per cent of offences.

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