Ban politicians not burkinis | James Harrington

The burkini controversy that gripped France this summer has cast the country in an unhealthy, intolerant, light. The mayors of a few resorts implemented temporary bylaws banning people from wearing the full-body swimwear for reasons, they said, ranging from the secular to the sanitary – and included security for good measure. 

The local laws delighted Marine Le Pen, who leapt on the issue. Both prime minister Manuel Valls and women’s minister Laurence Rossignol gave their qualified support, even as they called for local authorities to ease community tensions.

Before this, the organisers of a private burkini pool party in Marseille had cancelled the event after death threats.

The story was picked up by news organisations all over the world and did nothing to boost France’s image overseas as the country feels the pinch ...

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