Problems and possibilities with Brexit

Connexion readers give their opinion on the impact and implications of Brexit

Many correspondents to Connexion view Brexit with horror. Many chose to come and live in France and accepted the way of life, quality of food, superb wines – all at prices more affordable than in the UK.

The cost of living in France has been more reasonable but nothing lasts forever. The ‘Remoaners’ want the best of both worlds and are unhappy with the democratic vote that took place in 2016.

As a couple who invested in France over 16 years ago, we knew what we bought into and expect to pay accordingly.

Any changes to exchange rates, tax laws etc are part of the experience.

Connexion shows much bias against Brexit – many correspondents with PhDs/Professorships have little or any knowledge of the real world of private enterprise.

The rest of us get on and work hard to create business and jobs. All these workers pay tax and contribute to the wealth of our country.

Our motor industry is thriving with both cars and engines being designed and built in the UK. Unlike Europe, we work with unions for the benefit of employers and employees.

We no longer have aggressive unions in the UK except those herding the public sector into expensive salary/pension set-ups that cost us all dear.

Please recognise us as realists who understand a thing or two about the ability to stand on our own two feet against an undemocratic Europe who have ripped off the UK for so many years and continue to do so. Messrs. Blair/Brown & Cameron/Osborne should be ashamed of their disregard for UK freedoms and our future with their personal dreams of political career enhancements within the EU.    

Anthony and Janine Marfleet, Var

 

We left the UK in 1978 and over the past 40 years have lived, studied and worked in France, Spain and Belgium. We consider ourselves European, a chance being denied to future generations from the UK.

We do not want to change our nationality neither go through the rigmarole of applying for a cartes de séjour since it will still not give us freedom of movement throughout the rest of Europe.

The UK abandoned us by not giving us a vote in the referendum, so we and others like us need the EU to maintain our European status and the right to freedom of movement.

This would be an elegant way for the EU to acknowledge the contributions made by thousands of UK subjects to Europe over nearly two generations.

Lesley and Roy Massingham, Pyrénées-Atlantiques

 

In articles about the impact of Brexit, the position of holiday home owners is rarely talked about.

We are not resident and therefore cannot apply for citizenship or residency cards. We are finally retired and able to spend time in France but with family and especially young grandchildren in the UK, we have no plans for residency.

Now we read about a visa proposal to limit stays to 90 days in every 180 days. While 80% of households will not have to pay taxe d’habitation – it currently looks like holiday home owners will have to pay these taxes and yet may not be able to access their own holiday homes for as much time as they would like.

It would be madness!

We have restored a village house that was empty for years.

We spend money at markets, shops and buying produce from our neighbours.

We have our car serviced at a local garage and support local concerts, fêtes etc. Our friends and family come over and increase spending levels and yet we feel our circumstances are not being recognised.

Sue Dudley and Alan Moss, Aude

 

Editor’s Note: Second-home owners are not a separate ‘category’ in the Brexit negotiations. So far, only a deal relating to existing residents has been agreed, hence more coverage of this. We look at possible scenarios for future visitors to France (this includes second-home owners) and the Etias ‘visa-free’ scheme which will apply in our new Brexit guide.  

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