France's old railway stations back on track

This image taken at Carlux station by photographer Robert Doisneau and shows his wife and friends. The station is now a museum dedicated to his work

SNCF says its policy is to keep these buildings where possible, as they are part of its heritage

Rural railway stations are a distinctive feature of France’s architecture. Many no longer have trains stopping but they have been given a new lease of life as homes – or even as a museum or arts centre.

SNCF says its policy is to keep these buildings where possible as they are part of its heritage. It wants to find partners to work with so stations can be shared and
the buildings given new life.

Lionel Treussard, regional projects director for SNCF Gares et Connexions, said nearly all were built from the mid-19th to the start of the 20th century.

“They were constructed as the railway network extended over the country. At that time, there were several different private railway companies. SNCF ...

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