Meet French ecologist Yann Arthus-Bertrand

The time for talking about saving the planet needs to be replaced by action – and we are all responsible, ecologist and aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand tells Jane Hanks

Most people know of the French photo-journalist and ecologist Yann Arthus-Bertrand through one of his books, The Earth from the Air, which was first published in 1999.

On the front page is the famous photo of a decimated mangrove swamp in New Caledonia, where the receding vegetation has left the shape of a yellow heart. He was the first person to use aerial photography to reveal the extent of human damage to the earth.

Nearly twenty years on he continues to make films, take photographs, talk at exhibitions of his work and act as President of the GoodPlanet Foundation he created to limit environmental damage. Despite all that he feels that still, people do not understand the threat to the world we live in.

Jane Hanks talked to him just before the opening of an exhibition of photographs from his film Home which are on show at Sarlat, Dordogne until September 16.

He is a very busy man and grabbed a few minutes at the end of a car journey to talk to me on his mobile phone. The week before he had been in Brittany to talk about his new film to be released in 2019, Woman and that week he was due to go to Sarlat for a conference debate about his exhibition there.

Above all he wanted to talk about ecology, and there was frustration and anger in his voice when he said that things were getting worse not better in the environment:

“The photos are very beautiful, but behind all that there are very important things which are happening. Every year the figures are worse ...

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