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Reminder: Only one week left to get Paris 2024 Olympics tickets

The sign-up to the special ballot for tickets end on April 20. If your name is chosen, you will be able to buy tickets from May 11

The Paris 2024 Olympic Games are set to begin in just under 500 days Pic: rarrarorro / Shutterstock

If you have not yet signed up for Paris 2024 Summer Olympic tickets, you only have one week left to sign up for the second stage of ticket sales.

In the first sales window, you could only buy ticket bundles, which covered several different Olympic events.

But in the second stage, you will be able to buy single event tickets. 

Organisers are again using a ballot method, but this will close on April 20 at 18:00 (CET). If you are among the names selected, you will be able to buy tickets from May 11.

The registration period lasts one month overall

The first stage, which ran from February 15 to March 15, saw ticket bundles being sold, with a minimum of three events included in each package. 

Around three million of a total of 10 million tickets for the events were on offer in the first stage.

In the second stage, you can only buy tickets for individual events. For example, if you want to buy tickets to see both the cycling and discus competitions, you will need to make two separate purchases instead of bundling them together. 

The ability to sign up for the second stage of tickets started on March 15, but the ballot is not chosen on a 'first come first served' basis, meaning it is equally likely for both the first and last people to sign up to be in with a chance of purchasing tickets.

If you are lucky enough to be chosen, you will receive an email before May 9 with a 48-hour ‘purchase slot’ (which will be from some time after May 11), where you can buy your tickets.

All tickets are purchasable only via the official ticket website

In a bid to stop resales, all packs are digital only and attached to the name of the account holder on the website.

Read more: What sports can the public access for free at the Paris 2024 Olympics?

First stage controversy

It is hoped the second stage will go smoother than the first one. Some criticised the first round for being expensive and the random nature of purchase slots. 

Despite organisers saying there would be more than one million tickets available at €24, many of these were snapped up by people with earlier  ‘purchase slots’, leaving only expensive tickets to those with later appointments. 

Because all first-stage tickets were bought in a bundle, these already expensive single-event tickets had to be purchased alongside at least two other events, running costs into the high hundreds – or even thousands – of euros.

“These packages are a way to get people interested and buy tickets for a water polo semi-final, hockey or 7-a-side rugby, sports for which there may have been less demand,” Michael Aloisio, spokesman for Paris 2024, told Associated Press.

“We know that people are going to be disappointed, and we know that we don’t have tickets for everybody. However… [there are] more selling phases with more tickets,” he added.

The remaining tickets are expected to go on sale at the end of the year.

Are you going to sign up to buy tickets for this stage? Have you already purchased tickets? Is there an event you are most looking forward to? Let us know via news@connexionfrance.com

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