Drivers are in a rut

The authorities should make sure that all highway lanes are kept in tip-top condition and then we will have no excuse for not using the inside lane on motorways.

I can’t disagree with fines for doing this, but would point out that the inside lane is used a lot by lorries.

Over time, this can cause ruts to be created, particularly during hot weather, which will make cars “wander” as if the steering is faulty.

I have had a lot of experience in the UK of this problem and France is no different, particularly where Tarmac is used.

There are far more important safety issues to deal with, such as improving driver vision at junctions, getting rid of many pedestrian crossings (in my small village we have seven, within 200 metres), and making them more visible on approach.

Also, better driver training when it comes to awareness of other road users and potential hazards.

Far too many French drivers think the road is “just for them” and haven’t come to terms with ever-increasing traffic density.

Most local roads are barely wide enough for modern cars and lorries, leaving little margin for error. In country areas they are not wide enough to allow two lorries to pass safely or accommodate huge tractors and agricultural machinery.

Most of the roads in my area suffer from “surface creep” as retaining kerbs are not installed, allowing the road surface to crack and crumble at the edges, causing deep and dangerous ruts and narrowing the usable surface. These can be as dangerous as potholes.

I would get rid of “priority from the right” completely. It still exists due to muddled laws and local pressure on mayors. It might be okay for locals who get to know the danger spots but those not familiar with the area can easily be caught out.

Richard Best, Seine-Maritime

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