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The French cities where home insurance is most expensive

A new study has shown that premiums tend to cost more in southern cities, and suggests that prices will go up in 2023

A new study has shown the major French cities in which home insurance is the most expensive Pic: Robert Kneschke / Shutterstock

Home insurance premiums are most expensive in the south-east and south of France, and are set to rise this year as a result of climate change and other factors, a new study suggests. 

Insurance company Leocare has predicted that on average, prices will rise by 8% across France this year. This is because climate change is causing catastrophes naturelles natural disasters such as flooding and landslides to become increasingly common. 

When the government issues a notice stating that a catastrophe naturelle has occurred, insurance companies are obliged to pay out to affected customers, and so France’s changing weather patterns are proving expensive for them.

Catastrophes naturelles caused €4.4billion in damage last year. 

Read also: Vehicles, homes: claiming compensation for weather damage in France

Premiums are also being pushed up by the consequences of the war in Ukraine, which has caused the price of raw materials to rise, making repairs more expensive. The cost of roof tiles has, for example, increased by 29.4% over the past year, Leocare states. 

In addition, manmade risks such as burglaries are becoming more likely to occur. In 2019, there were 222,130 burglaries reported in France, while in 2021, there was 260,099.

How do premiums vary?

There currently exists significant variation in home insurance premium prices depending on the area of France. 

Leocare’s study calculated the average price of an insurance contract in nine major cities, using 540 contracts taken out between November 10 and December 6, 2022.

The price varies depending on the nature of the property, the owner’s profile and the level of cover requested, but Leocare has worked out separate averages for 60m2 apartments and 100m2 houses. 

Apart from Paris, the cities in which home insurance is most expensive are located in the south. 

In Marseille, the average price for an apartment is €21.23 per month, and €46.86 for a house. The cost is similar in Nice, where flats cost €21.32 on average, and houses €45.39.

In Toulouse, it is €18 for an apartment and €45.26 for a house on average.

“Episodes involving flooding or drought are becoming more and more common in the cities of the south east, which pushes insurance premiums up,” Christophe Dandois, the cofounder of Leocare, told Capital

“These weather events make buildings more fragile, which again increases slightly the risk of damage.” 

In Paris, home insurance costs €20.36 per month on average for flats and €48.39 for houses because although the weather is generally calmer, property is worth more, and acts of vandalism are more common.

In Rennes, meanwhile, insuring an apartment costs around €13.45 per month, and a house €29.50.

If you are looking to buy a house, or you want to know more about the risks to which your property is exposed, you can consult this government website by entering your address or postcode into the search bar. 

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