Make sense of: Sworn translators in France

However good your French, there may be occasions when you need the services of a sworn, or official, translator for administrative formalities.

You will be asked to use a traducteur agrée – a translator on a list of legal experts complied by the courts – if, for example, you apply to change a foreign driving licence to a French licence.

The translation is referred to as traduction certifiée conforme à l’original or officielle.

Any translator who wishes to work with the courts on legal cases and translate official documents can apply to their local Tribunal de Grande Instance to become authorised.

They will be taken on if their qualifications and experience are sufficient and if there is a need in that area.

They will then be put on a list (tinyurl.com/rc5hmel), which is held ...

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